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  #11  
Old 08-08-2019, 01:33 PM
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Brain Behav Immun. 2019 Jul 26. pii: S0889-1591(19)30647-6. doi: 10.1016/j.bbi.2019.07.028. [Epub ahead of print]

Combination of cannabinoids, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), mitigates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) by altering the gut microbiome.

Al-Ghezi, et al

Abstract

Currently, a combination of marijuana cannabinoids including delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) is used as a drug to treat muscle spasticity in patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Because these cannabinoids can also suppress inflammation, it is unclear whether such patients benefit from suppression of neuroinflammation and if so, what is the mechanism through which cannabinoids act.

In the currently study, we used a murine model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), to study the role of gut microbiota in the attenuation of clinical signs of paralysis and inflammation caused by cannabinoids.

THC+CBD treatment attenuated EAE and caused significant decrease in inflammatory cytokines such as IL-17 and IFN-γ while promoting the induction of anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10 and TGF-β. Use of 16S rRNA sequencing on bacterial DNA extracted from the gut revealed that EAE mice showed high abundance of mucin degrading bacterial species, such as Akkermansia muciniphila (A.muc), which was significantly reduced after THC+CBD treatment. Fecal Material Transfer (FMT) experiments confirmed that THC+CBD-mediated changes in the microbiome play a critical role in attenuating EAE. In silico computational metabolomics revealed that LPS biosynthesis, a key component in gram-negative bacteria such as A.muc, was found to be elevated in EAE mice which was confirmed by demonstrating higher levels of LPS in the brain, while treatment with THC+CBD reversed this trend. EAE mice treated with THC+CBD also had significantly higher levels of short chain fatty acids such as butyric, isovaleric, and valeric acids compared to naÔve or disease controls.

Collectively, our data suggest that cannabinoids may attenuate EAE and suppress neuroinflammation by preventing microbial dysbiosis seen during EAE and promoting healthy gut microbiota.
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  #12  
Old 08-17-2019, 03:35 PM
GoatHerder GoatHerder is offline
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My last neurologist kept pushing that for my symptoms, but I declined strongly.

Because THC is still illegal under federal law, I have no desire to lose my second amendment rights to own and carry a firearm, for a few less symptoms (if it even worked for me!)
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  #13  
Old 08-17-2019, 04:26 PM
Suebee Suebee is offline
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I echo Goathearder. Because it is illegal under federal law (and the minority of states) it is a treatment that may cause a MSer greater legal woes than symptomatic relief. This isn't to say it is not hugely beneficial to manage some MS symptoms, it just is not an option for all.
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  #14  
Old 02-01-2020, 06:54 PM
toneroni toneroni is offline
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Thanks for sharing this information.

I got medical marijuana card in bakersfield for my MS and it's awesome. For me, cannabis has been extraordinarily helpful with spasticity vs prescription drugs like carbamazepine. Honestly, they had me on quite a few different anti-spasticity drugs, but that is the only one I recall at the moment. I find smoking it to be my favorite because the effects are immediate, and you can control you doses better. I’ve had success with both THC and CBD. I usually aim for a strain which is 3-5% THC and 9-15% CBD. I also make CBD coconut oil to add to tea or other things. If you have specific questions I have answers! Not that I`m an expert by any means! I’ve just had to do a lot of research on it.

Last edited by toneroni; 02-08-2020 at 05:42 AM.
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  #15  
Old 03-21-2020, 10:10 AM
loopylady loopylady is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by toneroni View Post
Thanks for sharing this information.

I got medical marijuana card in bakersfield for my MS and it's awesome. For me, cannabis has been extraordinarily helpful with spasticity vs prescription drugs like carbamazepine. Honestly, they had me on quite a few different anti-spasticity drugs, but that is the only one I recall at the moment. I find smoking it to be my favorite because the effects are immediate, and you can control you doses better. Iíve had success with both THC and CBD. I usually aim for a strain which is 3-5% THC and 9-15% CBD. I also make CBD coconut oil to add to tea or other things. If you have specific questions I have answers! Not that I`m an expert by any means! Iíve just had to do a lot of research on it.
thanks for sharing. I've wondered many times if I should check into this but it concerns me because I don't really want to feel "high". My brother, God rest his soul, had Parkinson's and Crohn's...he would have taken it any way he could get it.
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  #16  
Old 03-21-2020, 10:11 AM
loopylady loopylady is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ActiveMSers View Post
Brain Behav Immun. 2019 Jul 26. pii: S0889-1591(19)30647-6. doi: 10.1016/j.bbi.2019.07.028. [Epub ahead of print]

Combination of cannabinoids, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), mitigates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) by altering the gut microbiome.

Al-Ghezi, et al

Abstract

Currently, a combination of marijuana cannabinoids including delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) is used as a drug to treat muscle spasticity in patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Because these cannabinoids can also suppress inflammation, it is unclear whether such patients benefit from suppression of neuroinflammation and if so, what is the mechanism through which cannabinoids act.

In the currently study, we used a murine model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), to study the role of gut microbiota in the attenuation of clinical signs of paralysis and inflammation caused by cannabinoids.

THC+CBD treatment attenuated EAE and caused significant decrease in inflammatory cytokines such as IL-17 and IFN-γ while promoting the induction of anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10 and TGF-β. Use of 16S rRNA sequencing on bacterial DNA extracted from the gut revealed that EAE mice showed high abundance of mucin degrading bacterial species, such as Akkermansia muciniphila (A.muc), which was significantly reduced after THC+CBD treatment. Fecal Material Transfer (FMT) experiments confirmed that THC+CBD-mediated changes in the microbiome play a critical role in attenuating EAE. In silico computational metabolomics revealed that LPS biosynthesis, a key component in gram-negative bacteria such as A.muc, was found to be elevated in EAE mice which was confirmed by demonstrating higher levels of LPS in the brain, while treatment with THC+CBD reversed this trend. EAE mice treated with THC+CBD also had significantly higher levels of short chain fatty acids such as butyric, isovaleric, and valeric acids compared to naÔve or disease controls.

Collectively, our data suggest that cannabinoids may attenuate EAE and suppress neuroinflammation by preventing microbial dysbiosis seen during EAE and promoting healthy gut microbiota.
Thanks Dave for all you do for us and the information you share with us.
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  #17  
Old 04-28-2020, 10:53 AM
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Original Article
Published: 25 April 2020

Effects of THC/CBD oromucosal spray on spasticity-related symptoms in people with multiple sclerosis: results from a retrospective multicenter study

Francesco Patti, Clara Grazia Chisari, [Ö]on behalf of the SA.FE. group
Neurological Sciences (2020)

Abstract

Introduction
The approval of 9-δ-tetrahydocannabinol (THC)+cannabidiol (CBD) oromucosal spray (Sativexģ) in Italy as an add-on medication for the management of moderate to severe spasticity in multiple sclerosis (MS) has provided a new opportunity for MS patients with drug-resistant spasticity. We aimed to investigate the improvement of MS spasticity-related symptoms in a large cohort of patients with moderate to severe spasticity in daily clinical practice.

Materials and methods
MS patients with drug-resistant spasticity were recruited from 30 Italian MS centers. All patients were eligible for THC:CBD treatment according to the approved label: ≥ 18 years of age, at least moderate spasticity (MS spasticity numerical rating scale [NRS] score ≥ 4) and not responding to the common antispastic drugs. Patients were evaluated at baseline (T0) and after 4 weeks of treatment (T1) with the spasticity NRS scale and were also asked about meaningful improvements in 6 key spasticity-related symptoms.

Results
Out of 1615 enrolled patients, 1432 reached the end of the first month trial period (T1). Of these, 1010 patients (70.5%) reached a ≥ 20% NRS score reduction compared with baseline (initial responders; IR). We found that 627 (43.8% of 1432) patients showed an improvement in at least one spasticity-related symptom (SRSr group), 543 (86.6%) of them belonging to the IR group and 84 (13.4%) to the spasticity NRS non-responders group.

Conclusion
Our study confirmed that the therapeutic benefit of cannabinoids may extend beyond spasticity, improving spasticity-related symptoms even in non-NRS responder patients.
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