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  #11  
Old 09-13-2016, 04:05 PM
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Here's a piece by a NY Times writer about a common-sense approach to diet. A good read about the author's take on simple rules to follow for healthy eating. - D

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Over the past few months, Iíve written a number of times on how nutrition recommendations are seldom supported by science. Iíve argued that what many people are telling you may be inaccurate. In response, many of you have asked me what nutrition recommendations should say.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/21/up...line&te=1&_r=0
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Old 06-27-2019, 01:41 PM
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This study came up again when discussing the results from the recent Wahls study. Both this and her study found fatigue reductions in plant-based diets. There is growing science that lowering your BMI and improving cholesterol numbers could lessen fatigue.
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Old 07-31-2019, 01:05 AM
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Default BMI and MS Outcomes

From the conclusions:

The conclusion says ...it resulted in no significant improvement on brain MRI, relapse rate or disability as assessed by EDSS scores in subjects with RRMS over one year...The diet group however showed significant improvements in measures of fatigue, BMI and metabolic biomarkers.

I think it is important to note that there ARE studies that correlate BMI with MS outcomes.

Study
http://n.neurology.org/content/91/24/e2256.long

Conclusions
Higher BMI appears to be associated with greater reductions in nGMV and nBPV, which is relevant because, in particular, nGMV loss portends greater longer-term disability. Because obesity is modifiable, further studies should explore these relationships in detail, and evaluating the effect of reducing BMI on imaging and clinical outcomes in MS may be warranted.
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