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Old 10-26-2017, 11:30 AM
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Default Effects of a maximum strength training program on fatigue, functional ability in MS

Effects of a maximum strength training program on perceived fatigue and functional ability in patients with multiple sclerosis

ECTRIMS Online Library. Gomez-Illan R. Oct 27, 2017; 200914

Abstract: P1259
Type: Poster
Abstract Category: Therapy - symptomatic - 33 Treatment of specific symptoms

Background: Resistance programs are considered one of the most recommended training methods to improve simultaneously fatigue symptoms and functional ability in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). However, it is not clear to what extent high loads (>80% of one-repetition maximum) could be applied to maximize the effect size of the strength interventions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a maximum strength-training program on fatigue in patients with MS.

Method: Twenty-six patients with relapsing and remitting MS were randomly distributed into an intervention group (IG) (n=13; 9 females, 4 males; EDSS = 2.380.98; Age = 45.3111.06 years) and a control group (CG) (n=13; 12 females, 1 males; EDSS = 2.811.33; Age = 41.319.58 years). The IG completed 12 weeks of maximum strength training (90% of one-repetition-maximum). An isokinetic dynamometer (Model 2000, Multi-joint System 4 Pro, Biodex Corporation, Shirley, NY, USA) was used to assess knee strength.The isokinetic peak torque (PTIK) was estimated to assess knee flexor and extensor strength during maximum concentric exertions at 60/s. Perceived fatigue and functional ability were evaluated using the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) and the Timed-Up & Go Test (TUG), respectively. Two-way mixed ANOVAs for repeated measures were performed for all variables. Hedges' g effect size index (dg) was calculated to assess the practical signification of within and between group differences. Additionally, Pearson correlation analyses were performed between PTIK, perceived fatigue and TUG scores.

Results: In comparison to CG, knee extension and flexion isokinetic strength increased significantly (knee-extension PTIK: +16.22%, dg = 1.07; knee-flexion PTIK: +29.55; dg = 1.00) and perceived fatigue (-39.53%; dg = 2.92) and TUG execution time (-19.83%; dg = 0.87) diminished significantly in the IG after the intervention period. Correlational analyses showed a significant correlation between changes in PTIK and perceived fatigue reduction (r = 0.51; p < 0.05).

Conclusion: Based on our findings, maximum strength training programs seem to be effective in reducing perceived fatigue and improving functional ability, maximizing the intervention effect size.

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Old 10-26-2017, 11:39 AM
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How to calculate 90% of your 1 rep max? Bodybuilding.com has a handy calculator.

https://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/other7.htm
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