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Old 11-12-2019, 02:05 PM
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Arrow SNEAK PEEK: Proposed MS exercise guidelines for personal trainers

A new article in a publication (Personal Training Quarterly) from the National Strength and Conditioning Association discusses potential exercise guidelines for personal trainers working with clients who have multiple sclerosis. They use kid gloves a bit too much IMO (only light to moderate cardio??), but for newbies, it's a good start. They include sample exercises for pool and range of motion exercises, resistance and flexibility exercises (land-based), and cardiorespiratory training. Included in the guidelines is a sample eight-week program. -D

Quote:
There are almost one million people in the United States living with multiple sclerosis (MS), and about 2.3 million globally. Research supports the benefits of a comprehensive exercise program that includes hydrotherapy exercises, resistance training, flexibility, and cardiorespiratory activities for those living with MS. This article aims to provide personal trainers with ideas for exercises to meet the needs of individuals with MS.

https://www.nsca.com/education/artic...ple-sclerosis/
What do you think of these guidelines? Agree with them? Would you recommend tweaks or full-on changes? Any advice for the NSCA?
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Old 11-12-2019, 04:39 PM
Becky Milot-Bradford Becky Milot-Bradford is offline
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Default Not official guidelines

Thank you for your interest in this article from Personal Training Quarterly (PTQ). Please note that while PTQ is a publication of the National Strength and Conditioning Association, this article is not an official position statement of the association and does not contain official exercise guidelines. The statements and comments in PTQ are those of the individual authors and contributors.
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Old 11-12-2019, 04:54 PM
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Thanks for the clarification, Becky. I made changes to reflect that...
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Old 11-13-2019, 12:47 AM
Tammy Hamilton Tammy Hamilton is offline
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Default Living It

I am a Certified Personal Trainer and I also have Secondary Progressive MS. I run a private gym that caters to seniors and those with disabilities. 3 1/2 years ago I couldn't climb a flight of stairs due to weakness caused by the disease process of MS. Today, I not only climb stairs, I can squat 120 to depth. I struggle a lot with balance but the disability of MS has greatly diminished due to progressive overload weight training. Because of fatigue and physical stress of having a degenerative disease I train three days a week and implement basically six exercises (not all on the same day) - squat, deadlift, press, bench press, rows, and lat pull. I train regularly and hard. It took me six months to acquire the balance and strength to squat down and stand up. Developing muscle memory and forcing muscle adaptation are key to living the best you can with MS. I have found muscle weakness to be a big cause of enhanced disability. The hip flexers are the first to go for many. A sedentary lifestyle is encouraged due to fatigue and the loss of body control. Even people that are wheelchair bound can get strong. I have found success to be that it is not so much about what you have but what you do with what you have. I encourage everyone to get strong to live strong.
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Old 11-29-2019, 11:23 PM
Suebee Suebee is offline
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Tammy. Your story is so encouraging. I am told over and over again by drs that my weakness is due to de-conditioning. This is frustrating because it suggests I can can easily recondition my body. However, no one is helping me find tools or methods to do so. Poor endurance, muscle weakness, poor balance and motor control are huge obstacles to my fitness. Do you have any tips to share to help overcome these MS obstacles?
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