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  #21  
Old 04-23-2020, 11:07 PM
Suebee Suebee is online now
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Default Latest neuro view

In Mult Scler Relat Disord. 2020. doi: 10.1016/j.msard.2020.102073, The COVID-19 pandemic and the use of MS disease-modifying therapies, Gavin Giovannoni et al. Dr. G and multiple other neurologists published a commentary on MS treatment during pandemic. Their recommendations are meant as a guideline and seem consistent with his prior postings. My personal takeaway: 1) don't hold breath for vaccine - but do adequately treat your MS. The commentary explains, " Vaccines take time to be developed, tested and introduced at a population level. Delaying [MS DMT] treatment, de-escalating therapy by switching to immunomodulatory DMTs, such as interferon-beta, glatiramer acetate or teriflunomide, or interrupting dosing of DMTs to wait for a vaccine will delay the adequate treatment of MS, especially as it may take 12Ė18 months to develop a vaccine. We, therefore, need a pragmatic response on management of the potential threat of COVID-19 in individuals with MS.*"
My Second takesway: each MS patient has a different risk profile. The commentary states,"It is essential to consider the potential risk of morbidity and possible mortality for each MS patient, who [may get] COVID-19. The individual's risk profile is multifactorial; their DMT and consequent immune response is one of the factors. Other aspects to consider... include: smoking practices (increased cigarette smoking increases risk); ambulatory status (less mobility increases risk, especially if the patient is in a wheelchair); age (increasing age increases risk); weight (increasing weight impacts on ambulation and respiratory function); underlying respiratory illnesses, such as asthma or COPD."
Importantly, Dr. G also notes that other risk factors to weigh when managing DMTs are the frequency of a patient's visits to at a healthcare facility for labs, MRIs, or infusions, because of possible increase of exposure to virus.
Link to full article here: https://es.ereprints.elsevier.cc/9PB0020/fulltext

Stay well my friends.
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  #22  
Old 05-04-2020, 09:40 PM
Suebee Suebee is online now
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Talking Consider buying pulse oximeter!

Have you all noticed that some doctors have suggested that people consider buying a pulse oximeter as a personal home monitor in case you or your family contracts covid19? This is because covid19 can cause "silent hypoxia", insidious oxygen deprivation. A NY times article (cited below) states, "Pulse oximetry is no more complicated than using a thermometer. These small devices turn on with one button and are placed on a fingertip. In a few seconds, two numbers are displayed: oxygen saturation and pulse rate. Pulse oximeters are extremely reliable in detecting oxygenation problems and elevated heart rate." According to the NYTtimes, the reason the device is particularly helpful for managing Covid pneumonia is because unlike other types of pneumonia, covid pneumonia patients "donít feel short of breath, even as their oxygen levels fall. And by the time they do, they have alarmingly low oxygen levels and moderate-to-severe pneumonia (as seen on chest X-rays). Normal oxygen saturation for most persons at sea level is 94 to 100 percent; Covid pneumonia patients [have been observed with] oxygen saturations as low as 50 percent." Similarly, a report by NPR (cited below) concurred, quoting another doctor's opinion that, "if you have symptoms consistent with the novel coronavirus, using a pulse oximeter*and*consulting with a doctor can be a good strategy." The NPR article did caution that a good oxygen saturation rate is only one piece of data, and to be aware of other symptoms of covid that may require medical attention such as severe dehydration or weakness.

I didnt want to sound alarmist so I was hesitant to post earlier that my family bought a pulse oximeter several weeks ago on line.( Be sure it is FDA approved and from a reputable vendor). Even though many are on backorder, keep on lookout for availability. Our Houston area Local hospitals had explained awhile back that treatment for covid19 would be managed at ones home, and an ER visit should occur only upon recommendation of a dr and to a correct facility prepared for your arrival. Since my daughter has asthma and I have weak chest/ core muscles from MS, we figured an objective oxygen saturation number would be helpful to us determine if we needed hospital care. Once the device arrived in the mail, our immediate benefit was feeling amazingly reassured that we could objectively recognize if we needed immediate medical attention. It also helped some panic attacks that were triggered by high pollen allergy induced respiratory issues. Such crazy times that a grass pollen allergy can make -one feel terminal.
Link to NYTimes article https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/20/o...pneumonia.html
Link to NPR article https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsan...dea-to-buy-one

Stay well. Stay safe. Please pardon typos/ spelling errors. Not my strong point.
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  #23  
Old 05-07-2020, 11:02 AM
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Thanks for all the updates, Suebee! The Gavin Giovannoni article is expanded here if folks want to read it.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7138156/
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  #24  
Old Today, 01:25 PM
Suebee Suebee is online now
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Default Interferon B as treatment for Covid19 ???

Prof. G at Bart’s in London explains for us lay people how interferon B might help treatment of Covid19.
He posted, “There is a question about whether interferon B can be used for the treatment of COVID-19. This is because interferons are anti-viral. However it is argued here that the dosing used in MS may not be high enough and that the high doses they suggest may cause side effects. ..[German scientists] are also talking about [using interferon B as a] treatment for severe COVID19. People with MS would be getting the benefit of prophylactic treatement. However, do people taking beta interferfon get COVID-19. The answer is yes. Do they recover? On the whole the answer is yes too, but that is the case for every one else on MS DMT unless you have the features associated with risk in the general population.”
Link to Prof G blog https://multiple-sclerosis-research....nst-mscovid19/

Link to German article in English https://www.thieme-connect.de/produc...55/a-1170-4395

Last edited by Suebee; Today at 01:30 PM. Reason: Link to article
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