ActiveMSers Forums  

Go Back   ActiveMSers Forums > ActiveMSers.org Forums > General

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 07-23-2015, 05:45 PM
Cvfactor Cvfactor is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 88
Default

Suebee,

Are you saying that Teva will no longer provide the 20mg formulation? I was under the impression that Teva was going to continue to sell this version. I think I recall hearing that if your doctor prescribes the brand name, the insurance company can't override it.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 07-23-2015, 06:42 PM
Suebee Suebee is offline
MS Gladiator
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 413
Default

No no. ! Sorry if my post was ambiguous or caused such concern.
My understanding is that health insurers will behave as they have with other generics and update their formularies to not cover brand copaxone in 20 mg daily dose when this generic formulation is available to sell. It is speculated I think that some patients may have a harder time justifying to their Health insurers a switch to 3x weekly dose once generic 20 mg daily dose is in formulary. My neurologist was very helpful to me. I wanted everyone here on brand copaxone to understand what I found out. It is a personal choice whether one is comfortable with using generic based on ones situation. Certainly, cost is an issue to everyone. I will feel more comfortable about the generic once it's being used and it's as effective as the brand. My understanding is that the FDA doesn't measure, or test the actual DM effect of the generic as opposed to the brand. So, I'll admit, my choice was motivated in part by this uncertainty , my fear. So I tried to encourage anyone using copaxone to discuss issue with dr.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 07-24-2015, 09:59 AM
Cvfactor Cvfactor is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 88
Default

I guess it would be true that if haven't switched yet to the 40mg, your insurance may give you a hard time with not switching to the generic. You sound like you have a good doc.

For me I'm staying on the 20. I would prefer for it to be Copaxone but if my insurance switches me I'll give it a try.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 08-02-2015, 06:10 PM
LivWell LivWell is offline
MS Warrior
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: I live in Cameron Park Ca
Posts: 156
Default

I picked up my first box of 20ml Glatopa earlier this month. I can either use it or go without I guess. I don't care for the other options I have for a DMD so I'm hoping the generic will be just as effective. It saves me a few dollars in co-pay, but I noticed that the full price is still high, over $3300 for a month's worth.
__________________


...\O/...
Liv__Well
..../\.......

My Two Numb Feet - An MS Diary
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 08-13-2015, 12:27 PM
Suebee Suebee is offline
MS Gladiator
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 413
Default

Livwell,
I'm glad you are on a DMD, science shows it improves the quality of Life with MS. And glaitimer acetate has a good track record. Also, Check out Research that CVfActor found on albuterol add on, posted on this site. It seems really promising.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 08-18-2015, 06:01 PM
fightback fightback is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
Posts: 4
Default

I have been on Glatopa, the generic version of Copaxone, for just over a month now. When you switch they pick up any co-pay so that goes to zero. I had a lot of trouble with the Glatopa auto-injector which operates much differently than the Copaxone auto-injector. The nurses at Glatopa support were not much help.

As with Copaxone you need to press the injector hard into your skin to get it to fire and then you need to ease off the pressure to get the Glatopa to start flowing. Unlike with Copaxone, the needle does not extend past the end of the injector if you ease off to much. So you need to ease off and then stop as soon as the Glatopa starts flowing. Then after a few seconds you can pull the injector away from you and all will be well. If you ease off too much you will end up pulling the needle out and when you pull the injector away the Glatopa will spill over you. It took me a couple of weeks to figure this out but now that I know how to use it I think it is actually a better design than the Copaxone auto-injector. Smoother injection and safer when you pull it away because the needle will be retracted inside the injector.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
copaxone, generic

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:26 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
ActiveMSers