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Old 06-28-2011, 05:44 PM
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Default STUDY: A "shocking" way to decrease fatigue

Really. - Dave

Decreased central fatigue in multiple sclerosis patients after 8 weeks of surface functional electrical stimulation.

Chang YJ, Hsu MJ, Chen SM, Lin CH, Wong AM.

259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Taoyuan, Taiwan. yjchang@mail.cgu.edu.tw.

Effective treatments for multiple sclerosis (MS)-associated central fatigue have not been established. Surface functional electrical stimulation (FES), which can challenge the peripheral neuromuscular system without overloading the central nervous system, is a relatively safe therapeutic strategy.

We investigated the effect of 8 weeks of surface FES training on the levels of general, central, and peripheral fatigue in MS patients. Seven of nine individuals with MS (average age: 42.86 +/- 13.47 years) completed 8 weeks of quadriceps muscle surface FES training. Maximal voluntary contraction, voluntary activation level, twitch force, General Fatigue Index (FI), Central Fatigue Index (CFI), Peripheral Fatigue Index, and Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS) scores were determined before and after training. The results showed that FI (p = 0.01), CFI (p = 0.02), and MFIS (p = 0.02) scores improved significantly after training. Improvements in central fatigue contributed significantly to improvements in general fatigue (p < 0.01).

The results of the current study showed that central fatigue was a primary limitation in patients with MS during voluntary exercise and that 8 weeks of surface FES training for individuals with MS led to significantly reduced fatigue, particularly central fatigue.
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Old 06-28-2011, 09:36 PM
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As I do EMS pretty much daily, this outcome was surprising to me. I have experienced improvement in muscle performance but not a bit of improvement in my fatigue. It may that the areas stimulated in the study are different than the ones I focus on. Perhaps that explains it.
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Old 06-30-2011, 09:59 AM
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Judy, what areas do you focus on? Curious.
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Old 07-07-2011, 05:39 PM
JudyW JudyW is offline
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Sorry for the late reply. I mostly focus on my impaired right leg where I experience drop foot as well as lack of control, compromised hamstring function, and low endurance. Were it not for that leg's deficits, I probably would walk fairly well. Anyway, over the period of six months or so that I have done this on a daily basis, there have been improvements, albeit not as dramatic as I'd like. But that's because I want to return to normal walking and anything short of that is frustrating. Given that we're talking about MS, though, that there has been no further deterioration, much less any improvement, is a victory.
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