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  #11  
Old 09-13-2016, 04:05 PM
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Here's a piece by a NY Times writer about a common-sense approach to diet. A good read about the author's take on simple rules to follow for healthy eating. - D

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Over the past few months, I’ve written a number of times on how nutrition recommendations are seldom supported by science. I’ve argued that what many people are telling you may be inaccurate. In response, many of you have asked me what nutrition recommendations should say.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/21/up...line&te=1&_r=0
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  #12  
Old 06-27-2019, 01:41 PM
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This study came up again when discussing the results from the recent Wahls study. Both this and her study found fatigue reductions in plant-based diets. There is growing science that lowering your BMI and improving cholesterol numbers could lessen fatigue.
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Old 07-31-2019, 01:05 AM
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Default BMI and MS Outcomes

From the conclusions:

The conclusion says ...it resulted in no significant improvement on brain MRI, relapse rate or disability as assessed by EDSS scores in subjects with RRMS over one year...The diet group however showed significant improvements in measures of fatigue, BMI and metabolic biomarkers.

I think it is important to note that there ARE studies that correlate BMI with MS outcomes.

Study
http://n.neurology.org/content/91/24/e2256.long

Conclusions
Higher BMI appears to be associated with greater reductions in nGMV and nBPV, which is relevant because, in particular, nGMV loss portends greater longer-term disability. Because obesity is modifiable, further studies should explore these relationships in detail, and evaluating the effect of reducing BMI on imaging and clinical outcomes in MS may be warranted.
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  #14  
Old 09-05-2019, 05:37 PM
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neurox, you are absolutely correct. While based on these results (and those from other studies), diet alone doesn't influence relapses, lesions or disability, diet clearly affects weight. Specifically BMI. And higher BMIs, as you posted, is associated with negative MS outcomes.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but it appears the general takeaway from MS diet studies is a) eat a healthy, balanced diet, and b) if you are overweight, make a concerted effort to lose those extra pounds. It might not matter how you lose those lbs (vegetarian, Mediterranean, Keto, gluten free, Wahls, etc.). Your MS will thank you. But if you are at a healthy weight, no "MS Diet" has been shown—in any clinical trials to date—to have any effect on disease progression.

Based on your username, it sounds like you may be a neurologist. And with an "x" it sounds even cooler, like a superhero. You just need a cape and a wicked Neuro X logo. Thoughts? On the diet part?

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Old 09-08-2019, 08:33 PM
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Default cupcakes vs cucumbers

Thank you Dave,

The name is a combo of latin for “nerves” and my real name. Trying for tragically cool but not fraudulently cool - I’m not a neurologist. Of course everyone will know my actual superpowers as soon as I use them

Quote:
Originally Posted by ActiveMSers View Post
But if you are at a healthy weight, no "MS Diet" has been shown—in any clinical trials to date—to have any effect on disease progression.
I agree that nobody has proven, scientifically, that a diet made up of specific foods will stop MS disease progression.

You underscored my point in posting about the BMI study - that implicitly, a good diet can lead to “better” general health (measured in part by BMI) which could improve or reduce MS symptoms. I have light RRMS (20 years) but I too notice my symptoms are not as bad when I “take care of myself” through diet and exercise.

I DO look forward to the time when doctors will be more adamant with their patients about the difference between the 500 calories in a frosted cupcake vs the 500 calories in a chicken salad. Along those lines, here’s my new favorite nutrition article outlining some randomized food trials and general health.

Dave thank you for your tireless efforts in sharing ways for MSers to do our absolute best.

Processed Foods Are a Much BIgger Problem Than We Thought
In two new papers published in the BMJ, the more ultraprocessed — or industrially manufactured — foods a person ate, the more likely they were to get sick and even die. In one study, they were more likely to suffer from cardiovascular problems. The other linked an ultraprocessed diet to a higher risk of death from all causes.

https://www.vox.com/platform/amp/sci...mpression=true

Last edited by neurox; 09-09-2019 at 12:55 PM.
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  #16  
Old 09-10-2019, 01:56 PM
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You make a great point, Rox. A calorie is not a calorie. And all vegetarian food is not healthy. Case in point: while the new Impossible Burger is extremely meat-like, it's likely as bad for you as the real thing, and far more processed. A straight-up veggie burger without the processing is far healthier. The Washington Post just ran a story on it yesterday in fact. -D

Quote:
But the industry has taken liberties with the definition of “plant-based.” Rather than focusing on whole foods such as vegetables, fruits, legumes and nuts, which is what health professionals mean when they recommend “plant-based eating,” food manufacturers are developing *ultra-processed burgers out of pea or soy protein, methylcellulose and maltodextrin, and liquid “eggs” out of mung bean protein isolate and gellan gum. Then they crown this ultra-processed food with an undeserved health halo.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifes...3c0_story.html
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  #17  
Old 09-10-2019, 02:37 PM
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Default Impossible to Digest Burger

Quote:
Originally Posted by ActiveMSers View Post
You make a great point, Rox. A calorie is not a calorie. And all vegetarian food is not healthy. Case in point: while the new Impossible Burger is extremely meat-like, it's likely as bad for you as the real thing, and far more processed. A straight-up veggie burger without the processing is far healthier. The Washington Post just ran a story on it yesterday in fact. -D

https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifes...3c0_story.html
It’s great to see that being published, thank you and amen about highly processed vegetarian foods. They may a way for big corps to continue profiting from junky ultra delicious food in broccoli’s clothing. Who could go to Burger King for a “plant based” whopper and not get fries? But just maybe, a few moderately paced processed veggie burgers are “less bad” than a few big macs, in the long run, as long as we keep perspective on all the trappings we’re rationalizing with them.

Last edited by neurox; 09-10-2019 at 02:48 PM.
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