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Old 03-08-2017, 06:06 PM
michraf michraf is offline
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Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 3
Default Inflow device (an indwelling cather forwomen)

Hello. This is a new device recently approved by the FDA. The company is trying to make sure insurance will cover it so is not charging patients for the device.

Anyway, I just started using catheters (much to my chagrin)and opted to go with this device. So far,so good I guess.

I'm curios if anyone else uses this? Thanks.
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  #2  
Old 03-14-2017, 01:36 PM
Suebee Suebee is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Houston, TX
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Thank you for posting about this device. I have a neurogenic bladder but have avoided catheters so far. I googled the device and it looks pretty amazing as a "prosthetic". It says there are 9 sizes and it is changed once a month. I guess infection and making sure you void are concerns, but that is the same with regular catheters too. I'd be interested to know how you like it, if it is comfortable and convenient. And really "invisible". I wish good luck with it. And again, I appreciate you posting about it.
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Old 03-15-2017, 12:10 PM
michraf michraf is offline
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Hi Suebee,
I managed to avoid catheters for a while. Did not have many infections at all, but difficulty voiding. Went to the gynourologist at the (strong) suggestion of my nuero.
Needless to say, after some testing, it was determined that I should cath. I self cathed for about a week then had the Inflow inserted. It is uncomfortable as your body adjusts to its presence then you don't feel it. The only inconvenient part of it is always making sure you have the "voiding device" with you at all times. It is about 9 in long and can be carried in a purse. Your bladder is always voided with its use. It is invisible, but you can feel it with your hand on the outside of your urethra. I was told on numerous occasions that people have preferred this overwhelmingly over self cathing.
Hope this helps.
Michraf
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  #4  
Old 03-18-2017, 03:47 PM
Suebee Suebee is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Houston, TX
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Yes thank you, that is really helpful information. I really appreciate your candor. It is hard to gauge how difficult cathing really is from medical professionals. It is good to know that your device is tolerable after you get used to it.

I have also heard that botox may be helpful to some people with neurogenic bladder, but I'm unsure how exact the science is on paralyzing some nerves and leaving others preserved so that one can still urinate predictably.

I saw there was a clinical trial for botox for MS patients with neurogenic incontinence, has anyone had success with this method? link to study info http://www.dignitystudy.com/
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