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  #51  
Old 10-22-2019, 10:33 PM
AMFADVENTURES AMFADVENTURES is offline
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Hey Suebee, my understanding is that they are essentially the same except Rituximab is derived from animal cells and Ocrevus is derived from human cells.

Because Ocrevus is derived from humans, some studies indicate it may be less likely for the recipient to develop an immunity to it, possibly making it the better choice although the action of both drugs on the B-cell is the same, ie; the antibody in the drug attaches to the B-cell immediately deactivating it and eventually causing B-cell death. Hope that made sense and good luck, I hope it works well for you.

Once you get started I hope you will stay with us. This thread appears to help other MSers make the DMT decision.

Larry

Last edited by AMFADVENTURES; 10-22-2019 at 10:47 PM.
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  #52  
Old 10-23-2019, 01:26 PM
AMFADVENTURES AMFADVENTURES is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Suebee View Post
I'm waiting for clearance to start Orceveous. I'm excited for possibility I will feel better on this DMD. Are rituximab and oreceveous related? Does anyone know how they are different?
Turns out that is really an interesting question Suebee. Truxima is considered a "biosimilar" to Rituxan. The pathway through FDA approval for a biosimilar is significantly reduced from that of a new drug but the approved usage of the biosimilar cannot exceed that of the original.

Ocrevus underwent the full FDA approval process because the application specifically included MS, something Rituximab nor Truxima have ever been technically approved for. Based on that I wonder if Ocrevus isn't actually a biosimilar to Rituxan also but it received "new drug" certification (and the associated higher price) because it underwent the full FDA certification process?

It may all just be trivia, but it's interesting trivia! I also haven't figured out what Truxima is derived from, that information doesn't seem to be readily available. I've fired off some e-mails and if I get an answer I'll be sure to let you know.

Larry

Last edited by AMFADVENTURES; 10-23-2019 at 01:52 PM.
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  #53  
Old 10-23-2019, 02:39 PM
AMFADVENTURES AMFADVENTURES is offline
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So I got a response back from MSAA about 20 minutes after I sent an inquiry. IMO, Those people really are the go to source for PWMS.

Anyway, this article, referred by MSAA, seems to specifically addresses your original question.

https://multiplesclerosisnewstoday.c...ents-concerns/

I still don't know the derivation of Truxima but I'm leaning toward animal as opposed to human.

Larry
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  #54  
Old 10-23-2019, 05:01 PM
MSLazarus MSLazarus is offline
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Default All very interesting

Timothy Volmer used Ocrevus/Rituxan just like that. He said they were the same. The deal was that the company was losing its patent on rituxan so it tweaked something, called it Ocrevus, and kept charging a high price. Rituxan was much cheaper. So this news is very interesting. Thanks.
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  #55  
Old 10-24-2019, 10:56 AM
Suebee Suebee is online now
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AM and MSlaz , thanks for you feedback and article. It had good overview of issues. I remembered there was a connection and controversy about the 2 drugs, but not any of the details. I cleared all the blood tests for healthy organs and no hepatitis and other viruses which would be become dangerous under immune suppression. Because of the cancer risk, I took it upon myself to get a mammogram screen and other screens for women (I.e. pap), and skin biopsy from derm. I also made effort to let each of my drs know Iím intending on taking orecvous soon and I wanted each office to share and review all my lab work. This integrated medicine or team approach I find the most challenging. My MS involves many disciplines and I believe each specialist gets too focused on that one specialty and doesnít look at the whole person. My neurologist agreed he wouldnít start orcevous until he actually reviews my mammogram screen BUT he didnít suggest or mention it before I did. Heís an excellent neurologist and it shows he is very receptive to my plan to make sure Iím ready for this drug, but it also underscores how one needs to self advocate and truly understand the risks one is undertaking with a DMD. Neurologist going to file insurance request papers after screen and another round of blood work. Iíll keep you updated. Thanks for your support.
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  #56  
Old 10-24-2019, 05:48 PM
MSLazarus MSLazarus is offline
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Default Thanks for your story SueBee...

I am happy with rituxan. I am 72 now but am getting new symptoms which is irritating. I am a farmer and don't like it when the schedule is interrupted! (That means somebody has to do my work).

Right now we are thinking that I am having attacks but they would be even worse without the rituxan. I get well again and go on doing physical work pretty much as usual.

I am falling almost once a day and chest spasms are pretty intense. However, you should see all the fingerling potatoes I have dug!

Thanks everyone for information.

Last edited by MSLazarus; 10-25-2019 at 07:12 PM.
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  #57  
Old 10-25-2019, 02:49 PM
AMFADVENTURES AMFADVENTURES is offline
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Hey Linda, sorry to hear the MS is acting up, falling that much is not a good thing! Are the chest spasms like a cramp? If they are, here's something you might try, I'd give it a slim chance of working. Mustard! Like from a fast food packet. Put a little on your tongue and swish it around in your mouth. The vinegar in the mustard hits a trigger point on the tongue which immediately causes the cramp to release. A non MSer friend of mine who is prone to crippling cramps while cycling swears by this. Consequently I now try to carry mustard with me when I go for long rides, just in case.

I don't recall ever having seen a study concerning long term effectiveness of Rituxan so now you have me wondering? I feel the same way you do, that my MS would be much worse without the drug but I too wonder if it's effectiveness might wear down with long term repeated use. I just posted news about an upcoming RMMSC Summit to be held in Denver on November 9th. Dr. Vollmer will be there and they have normally taken questions submitted in advance for Dr. Vollmer to address at the end of the session and the Long Term Effectiveness of Rituxan sounds like a good one!

I wasn't planning to go to this conference but perhaps now I will as I'm not sure whether or not you have to be present to submit a question. I'll let you know what happens.

Suebee, couldn't agree more about self advocacy and you certainly seem to have it under control. The only other thing I can recall my Drs. recommending before I started infusions was to get current on vaccinations.

Again, hope it works for you,

Larry
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  #58  
Old 10-25-2019, 07:21 PM
MSLazarus MSLazarus is offline
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Default Great...I hope you go

I saw Vollmer sometime around 2001. I saw him several times as he and my own neurologist were trying to figure out my next step. He is great.

Several years later I saw him at a conference and asked a question and mentioned that I had seen him several years earlier. He said that he remembered me. I told him that of course he did not remember me but I remembered him! He laughed heartily because it was true. But he had a huge impact on my treatment for a decade.

Almost everything I have taken wears off and becomes ineffective. But I have been helped by everything.

My chest spasms are extremely painful...as if I were having a heart attack. Does not feel like cramping. But that info on cramping is unique. I will pass it on to a friend.

Last edited by MSLazarus; 10-25-2019 at 07:25 PM.
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  #59  
Old 10-27-2019, 07:17 AM
MSLazarus MSLazarus is offline
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Default knowjust to be clearer...

I have done my major meds for many years before they wear off. Betaseron when it came on the market...IVIg for another 8 years. (170g every other week)....novantrone for the allowed limit...have been on rituxan for many years now...and yesterday was a harsh physical day on farm and I barely crawled into bed at 6 last night but here I am, it is around 7 the next morning, and I am moving and alert. That is the rituxan which I do squeeze the last drop of goodness from! My next infusion is in December.
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  #60  
Old 10-29-2019, 01:04 PM
Suebee Suebee is online now
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MS L, thank you for sharing your experience and your perseverence. I get strength and courage from this forum, and visualizing you farming pushed me to complete some of my important domestic mom suburban tasks. thank you.
BtW i also have chest pain but not cramping. It is real squeezing/ or pressure. It fluctuates and can be severe. No real answers from drs. Some rib cartilage is inflamed on films. I think drs see it as anxiety driven, but overtime I trusted myself, it has another cause. I blame MS malfuntion nerves, but no diagnosis particular to chest pain. Did doctors explain to you why it happens?
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