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Old 11-01-2018, 05:58 PM
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Exclamation STUDY: High-intensity interval exercise improves cognitive performance in MS

High-intensity interval exercise improves cognitive performance and reduces matrix metalloproteinases-2 serum levels in persons with multiple sclerosis: A randomized controlled trial

Philipp Zimmer, Wilhelm Bloch, Alexander Schenk, ...

First Published August 21, 2017 Research Article
https://doi.org/10.1177/1352458517728342

Abstract

Background:
Aerobic exercise can improve cognitive performance in healthy elderly people.

Objective:
The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of a 3-week high-intensity aerobic exercise programme (high-intensity training group (HIT)) on cognitive performance in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) compared with a standard exercise programme (control training (CT)).

Methods:
A total of 60 persons with MS (Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS): 1.0–6.5) were randomized to a HIT group (3×/week for 20 minutes, including five 3-minute exercise intervals at 80% of peak oxygen uptake (VO2-peak)) or a CT group (continuously 5×/week for 30 minutes/session at 65% of VO2-peak). Cognitive performance was assessed using the Brief International Cognitive Assessment for MS at entry (t0) and discharge (t1). Furthermore, VO2-peak, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, serotonin and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2 and -9 were measured.

Results:
Compared to CT, HIT significantly improved verbal memory. Significant improvements over time in executive functions were found in both groups. Secondary outcomes indicated significant improvements in VO2-peak and a significant reduction in MMP-2 in the HIT group only.

Conclusion:
HIT represents a promising strategy to improve verbal memory and physical fitness in persons with MS. Further research is needed to determine the impact of exercise on biomarkers in MS.
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Old 11-02-2018, 02:03 PM
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What's the difference between 65% and 80%? Here's what the CDC has to say....

Target Heart Rate and Estimated Maximum Heart Rate

One way of monitoring physical activity intensity is to determine whether a person's pulse or heart rate is within the target zone during physical activity.

For moderate-intensity physical activity, a person's target heart rate should be 50 to 70% of his or her maximum heart rate. This maximum rate is based on the person's age. An estimate of a person's maximum age-related heart rate can be obtained by subtracting the person's age from 220. For example, for a 50-year-old person, the estimated maximum age-related heart rate would be calculated as 220 - 50 years = 170 beats per minute (bpm). The 50% and 70% levels would be:

50% level: 170 x 0.50 = 85 bpm, and
70% level: 170 x 0.70 = 119 bpm
Thus, moderate-intensity physical activity for a 50-year-old person will require that the heart rate remains between 85 and 119 bpm during physical activity.

For vigorous-intensity physical activity, a person's target heart rate should be 70 to 85% of his or her maximum heart rate. To calculate this range, follow the same formula as used above, except change "50 and 70%" to "70 and 85%". For example, for a 35-year-old person, the estimated maximum age-related heart rate would be calculated as 220 - 35 years = 185 beats per minute (bpm). The 70% and 85% levels would be:

70% level: 185 x 0.70 = 130 bpm, and
85% level: 185 x 0.85 = 157 bpm
Thus, vigorous-intensity physical activity for a 35-year-old person will require that the heart rate remains between 130 and 157 bpm during physical activity.

Here is a good chart.
https://www.verywellfit.com/target-h...ulator-3878160

As a 50 YO, my 65% rate is around 113. My 80% rate is 139. I'm usually closer to 150 bpm, or about at 90%, when I do my HIIT.
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Old 11-02-2018, 02:09 PM
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And here is a calculator so you can get exact numbers, and it takes into account your resting heart rate, which makes it more accurate. I recommend a heart rate monitor so you can better track your numbers. The kind with a chest strap are more accurate than those on your wrist. I've found Polar makes good ones.

https://www.lifespanfitness.com/fitn...ate-calculator
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Old 11-02-2018, 02:25 PM
cl3me cl3me is offline
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While it's true the chest straps are more accurate, I love my wrist watch tracker - Garmin vivosmart HR+, tracks my HR continuously, I do find there is slight delay in my HR numbers on wrist monitor compared to when I used a chest strap, but readings are correct or at least close enough. also no more cleaning sweaty chest strap! My medic alert is also attached to my watch HR monitor. In addition to HR monitor, it tracks sleep, steps, intensity minutes, stairs, activity tracker including gps which I sync with Strava, watch will buzz when my HR for a given activity drops too low or goes too high, and is waterproof so can shower and swim with it as well.

At the gym I did like that the chest strap could be read by most equipment and would display the HR, much easier than having to hold the HR sensors on the equipment.
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Old 11-04-2018, 07:24 AM
Spacecake Spacecake is offline
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Smile Interested in learning more

I am 14 wks (who’s counting - since diagnosis and I was an avid exerciser before & I loved HIT. Now I’m not sure what is ‘safe’ - I’m doing core and walking & am signing up for Iyengar - but everything scares me a little right now & my anxiety is real. I used to do Tabata interval training during spin classes - I don’t want to go back to that super high intensity.,.but am interested in learning more about what they did in this study for their exercise & how to be ‘safe’ as I do miss the ‘high’ HIT gave me
Am I even making sense?!
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Old 11-04-2018, 02:37 PM
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Spacecake, welcome! And all the MS exercise research is pointing at HIIT as being the most effective type of exercise. Don't be afraid of it, and certainly don't avoid it. Embrace it! Super high intensity is where it's at with reducing cog fog and fatigue in MS, and you have the experience and tools to do it.

The first year of MS is one of the hardest IMO, as you are bombarded with questions and your brain will boggle as it tries to comprehend everything. Hang in there and maybe don't try to read too much on the internet. Hopefully you signed up to get my newsletter.
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Old 11-04-2018, 05:51 PM
Spacecake Spacecake is offline
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Default Merci!

Great advice - the internet is not a safe place for midnight searching! I have learned the hard way...I have been so scared to raise my heart rate too high...but I am remembering that I had episodes last year that were diagnosed as ‘anxiety’ & I got back On the bike then & did not die then...I can experiment and figure it out even though I might no longer be the person who jumps up to teach the class when the instructor is a no show!
Thank you for your writing - you are a fabulous wordsmith and the humor is fabulous - I did sign up for your newsletter....just thank you...
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Old 11-18-2018, 01:32 PM
randman randman is offline
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I love this thread, good info
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