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STUDY: Rhythmic music could help MSers walk better, improve QOL

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  • STUDY: Rhythmic music could help MSers walk better, improve QOL

    The effect of rhythmic-cued motor imagery on walking, fatigue and quality of life in people with multiple sclerosis: A randomised controlled trial

    Barbara Seebacher⇑ School of Health Sciences, University of Brighton, Eastbourne, UK

    Raija Kuisma School of Health Sciences, University of Brighton, Eastbourne, UK

    Angela Glynn School of Health Sciences, University of Brighton, Eastbourne, UK

    Thomas Berger Clinical Department of Neurology, Medical University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria

    Abstract

    Background: Motor imagery and rhythmic auditory stimulation are physiotherapy strategies for walking rehabilitation.

    Objectives: To investigate the effect of motor imagery combined with rhythmic cueing on walking, fatigue and quality of life (QoL) in people with multiple sclerosis (MS).

    Methods: Individuals with MS and Expanded Disability Status Scale scores of 1.54.5 were randomised into one of three groups: 17 minutes of motor imagery, six times per week, for 4 weeks, with music (A) or metronome cues (B), both with verbal cueing, and (C) controls. Primary outcomes were walking speed (Timed 25-Foot Walk) and distance (6-Minute Walk Test). Secondary outcomes were walking perception (Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale-12), fatigue (Modified Fatigue Impact Scale) and QoL (Short Form-36 Health Survey, Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale-29, Euroquol-5D-3L Questionnaire).

    Results: Of the 112 participants randomised, 101 completed the study. Compared to controls, both interventions significantly improved walking speed, distance and perception. Significant improvements in cognitive but not psychosocial fatigue were seen in the intervention groups, and physical fatigue improved only in the music-based group. Both interventions improved QoL; however, music-cued motor imagery was superior at improving health-related QoL.

    Conclusion: Rhythmic-cued motor imagery improves walking, fatigue and QoL in people with MS, with music-cued motor imagery being more effective.
    Dave Bexfield
    ActiveMSers

  • #2
    Thanks for posting this. Great reminder to use music to motivate and improve spirits. Get a good stride. But really, one has to wonder how much time and grant funds was spent to "prove" the power of music. Before iTunes, when Tower Records existed, I remember creating lots of Mix tapes. Ok, yah I date myself. There was a special tape for cruising town in the car with girlfriends, one for love songs that everyone had made but kept secret, and then there was my spring track tape i listened to everyday and I kept in my Walkman. I had selected songs with the perfect beat tempo and it made time pass so quickly. The first song the was "break my stride". For you all that weren't teenagers in the 80s, here is a sample of lyrics:
    "Ain't nothin' gonna to break my stride
    Nobody's gonna slow me down, oh-no
    I got to keep on movin'
    Ain't nothin' gonna break my stride
    I'm running and I won't touch ground
    Oh-no, I got to keep on movin'
    You're on a roll and now you pray it lasts
    The road behind was rocky
    But now you're feeling cocky
    You look at me and you see your past
    Is that the reason why you're runnin' so fast"

    Yes, great to remember that. I recently heard there is an app for that now, an app that will pick and play songs at a workout tempo you choose. I think I might try that out, but I'll update my play list, I promise.

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