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  • Greetings LadyWithAFan, and welcome!! Lots of good info here, thanks to Dave , our fearless leader. You keep on dancing, no matter what it looks like, lol!

    I can relate to the middle-school awkwardness. I routinely kicked my ankles when I walked, and was notorious for causing bodily harm to myself and bystanders during school sports.

    Keep on moving!


    ...\O/...
    Liv__Well
    ..../\.......

    My Two Numb Feet - An MS Diary

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    • Hi all -

      I was diagnosed four years ago after about 18 months of on-and-off tingling, screwy vision, poor balance, uncooperative legs — you know the deal.

      Told I had RRMS, I started a DMT right away. I'm pretty sure it has since transitioned to secondary progressive (my neurologist suspects so too but is waiting on an MRI I guess).

      I'm 44 now and have never been much of an athlete. But when I was 36 years old (before symptoms or diagnosis), I started going to the gym regularly. I got in pretty good shape and developed a real gym habit, which only took a break in the first six months after my diagnosis amid bouts of self-pity and fecklessness. I work out at home, because of COVID and maybe forever more; I'd rather use my energy to exercise than to haul back and forth between the gym, even though it's "only" a few blocks from here. (MS has re-shaped my notion of what's close and what's "walking distance.")

      I do about 20 minutes on a stationary bike five days a week (not easy, but a much better fit for my abilities than walking) and then a 10-minute leg/balance workout. Three days a week I do a more well-rounded strength and balance workout. It's not olympic-calibre stuff — unless walking in place on your tip-toes while you steady yourself on a chair is an Olympic event — but it gets the job done. The routines were developed by a local kinesiologist who specializes in working with people with MS and other brain malfunctions. (She was a HUGE find.)

      Looking forward to soaking up the wisdom of this community.

      - Dan

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      • Welcome! Glad you found Dave and his bunch of MS-ers! LOTS of good tips here from folks committed to staying active and fit. (And hey, I'll vote for a tippy-toe walking in place as an olympic event.)

        You're 100% right, whenever you find someone who specializes in MS or other neurological conditions to guide you towards maintaining your body it's huge. Stay tuned! Hope you find the info and insights here supportive.

        Keep on Moving!


        ...\O/...
        Liv__Well
        ..../\.......

        My Two Numb Feet - An MS Diary

        Comment


        • Dan! Man, glad to have you here. You'll hear gobs from me if you are signed up for our newsletters, so I'll keep my remarks brief. Plus, I gotta get in a quick workout!
          Dave Bexfield
          ActiveMSers

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          • can only hope to get back to that level of exertion!

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            • I was just diagnosed with MS(Multiple Sclerosis). But I am frustrated with the medical profession as it took three years to get here.

              I posted the below text on a local discussion board a couple weeks ago(A NON MS BOARD), mostly to capture my feelings on the matter, but also to help others understand the medical profession and why it took so long to get to a diagnosis for something so important.

              "I was just diagnosed with MS. I am in my 50s and this complicated the matter, as I am atypical for the diagnosis. But despite that, I have learned a few things during the diagnosis journey to figure out what was happening to me:

              1) I am an athlete. I have been my whole life. This complicated things in addition to my age. The medical profession is tuned to the average person. Exceptional people are unexpected and harder to diagnose due to factors many doctors aren't familiar with. For one, athletes are very tuned to their bodies...they know more clearly what is normal and what is not. Convincing a doctor something was wrong was BY FAR the hardest part of getting a proper diagnosis. Why, because I looked and acted just fine. I had been compensating for symptoms for a very long time and adapting very well.

              2) Trust your body. Only you know it best. If something feels consistently wrong, it probably is. Doctors can only go by a diagnostic analysis. Theorize, Test and Review results. But YOU know what you feel.

              3) Describe what's happening as thoroughly as possible, as factually as possible, and in the language of medical professionals if possible. I learned that understanding what to call what I was feeling was very very important. DOCUMENTING the symptoms over time was also important. I found this was critical to making a strong impression, at minimum that I was very serious.

              4) Don't accept simple answers. Occam's razor. The simplest explanation is most commonly true? Not always. I was told repeatedly my symptoms were due to "getting older", OR I was "exercising too much". NO, and NO.

              5) Don't accept a BS answer. If the doctor is not asking you for more information, they are the wrong doctor for you.
              A good doctor will dig in to understand what you are feeling. These doctors are rare. When you find one, make sure you tell them that they are rare and that you appreciate it. A good relationship with a good doctor is pure gold. I went through 5 doctors before I found one that would listen. And he got it immediately.

              I remember the old joke that all you need in life is a good doctor, a good accountant, and a good priest. I can vouch for two of these....

              6) Don't give in, Don't give up. I KNEW something was wrong. I KNEW it. Really pushing to get it evaluated properly took time to understand the medical profession. Getting that across required me to learn a new language and become a warrior for my own health. A breakthrough occurred where one doctor actually thought it was depression and tried to convince me of it. He send me to his partner who was a psychotherapist. She not only thought his answer was BS, but also gave me a Medical 101 on how to advocate for my own health. She understood my situation completely and saw how frustrated I was. Best thing she did was reassure me that I needed to keep pushing. Doctors are human. Despite structured medical training, they all have their own experience and learn their own way of fitting symptoms into boxes. Don't get put into a box.

              7) MS is not the disease it used to be. 40yrs ago it was quite dire. 20 yrs ago it was considered a disease of exception. Meaning, if you rule out everything else it could be neurologically, then its MS. NOT TRUE ANYMORE. It is as much a disease of inclusion as it is exclusion. Yes, they still need to test to make sure its not something else that mimics the same symptoms (like cancer, Lyme, and oddly enough...syphilis). But there are diagnostics that can confirm it's MS. I've spent the last three months doing test after test after test. MS IS a disease that requires confirmation, as the treatment is lifelong. The good news being that the current treatments are quite effective at suppression of symptoms, although the disease itself is still incurable.

              So the good news? Well, it's figured out now. I am told that at my age, it is not likely genetic(as apparently most are). I am told the other big way to get MS is by a trigger. A serious illness, particularly a viral infection, may spark the immune reaction that causes MS. I have had several serious infections over the past few years, so take your pick. This isn't perfect science, and much is still unknown, but I am buoyed by the extent of research into autoimmune diseases like this, so the future looks bright."

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              • Welcome to the group Wryfox, you'll find most of us have similar dx stories. For me it was an eye doc that put 2-2 together and got the ball rolling. Diving into the research will drive you crazy- so many opposing views and conflicting research it's not funny. The common theme seems to be to keep moving anyway you can.
                This seems to be a meeting place for like minded individuals. And Dave posts alot of great resources.

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                • Hi, my name is Angie I was in the U.S. Army and they suspected back in 1986 with a battery of tests scheduled and completed but as we all know it is hard to diagnose and back then after about 30 days all my symptoms would go away.Fast forward 32 years, and I was diagnosed officially 3.5 years ago after I found a physician who wouldn't take no for an answer.I was referred to a practice that specializes in MS but the doctor there completely ignored me an my concerns and 6 months later had the practice call me and leave a message that it was an emergency and I needed to call immediately. By that time I was seeing a different doctor who is rated number one in the state for MS treatment however he didn't treat anything he kept telling me my symptoms were not bad enough yet. I have no idea how bad he wanted me to get because the last time I saw him I could barely walk. My primary care physician frustrated at lack of treatment sent me to a 3rd doctor and his first words were "why haven't you been treated prior and how bad does he want you to get" Not once had any MS doctor told me until my 3rd opinion that I had PPMS and my new doctor told me the last doctor is notorious for not treating patients with PPMS

                  i was immediately scheduled for an Ocrevus infusion (of course had to wait on all of the insurance and drug companies)1st infusion has helped a bit at least I can walk. Not long distances or for a long time but at least from my desk to the ladies room without feeling like I'm going to collapse.

                  I use to run 5k's all the time just for fun swag, now I wish I could just run 10 feet but I will not let this disease control me!!
                  I am very thankful that I discovered ActiveMSers

                  Angie

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                  • Angie, it is such a pleasure to meet you. I'm glad you finally got a diagnosis after all of these years. This is a delightful and optimistic group of misfits and I'm glad you found us. In just wish it had been a wee bit earlier! Virtual hugs,

                    Dave
                    Dave Bexfield
                    ActiveMSers

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